Alex Wolf

Alex Wolf developed one side of her brain at Exeter and the other side at RISD, and has been integrating both sides ever since.

Working with Milton Glaser in the 80’s, setting typeface in the pre-digital era inspired a series of children’s books and animations, called the story of x. Working with master florist Kurt Rausch in the 90’s, gave an understanding of how nature’s patterns and structures inform the way we see.

As a new mother in the 00’s, Alex was shocked by the (lack of) selection of nature and biology games and toys on the market. Galvanized by her previous work designing for young minds, she decided to fill the void herself. Years of research on biology, cognition and education followed, alongside prototypes and testing her child and others.

While games are the vehicle to transmit ideas, she focuses on platform design, and na2ure is an ideas company, rather than a product company. The Periodic Table for Biology released as an app ferret and the analog Ani-gram-it game. The Pattern Alphabet first shown at at RISD Design Science and Sandbox Summit at MIT, in April 2016, has many forms it can take to reach its target audience. Alex is currently focusing on two complementary modules of hands on exhibit components and activity cards. The newest idea in the suite of visual platforms, the Motion ABC,  will address children 4-24 months, and continue into the Pattern ABC.


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Vijal Parikh

Vijal is fascinated by the brain and how we learn.

As a Neurobiology and Behavior major at Cornell University, he graduated Magna Cum Laude with honors in research. He went on to medical school at NYCOM and finished a residency in Psychiatry in June 2017. Vijal is a public psychiatry fellow at the NY State Psychiatric Institute at Columbia University Medical Center.

Vijal’s interest in early STEAM learning harks back to the magnet programs he attended in school, science competitions such as the Intel Science Talent Search, research projects as a mechanical and chemical engineering intern at Cooper Union, and as a researcher at Arecibo Space Telescope funded by the National Science Foundation.

He plays several instruments, codes and is passionate about the arts in its many forms, and hopes to find the intersection of where science and design meets, and where technology can expedite medicine.